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Polio and Me

Polio and Me: Ken Dalton

Take a trip back in time to 1943 and a young five year old boy named Kenneth Dalton whose life changed when he woke up one morning and could not move his limbs in order to walk, hold an object in his hand like an apple and is rushed to a hospital and taken out of his mother’s loving arms and placed in a room where no one but hospital staff was allowed to see him. Imagine being diagnosed with polio as your family doctor insists you remain in the hospital and in quarantine until you are no longer contagious. The story is told in a timeline fashion flashing back and forth from the past to the present as Kenneth relates his numerous surgeries, physical therapy sessions and the hope for a miracle to walk without his leg brace. Imagine being isolated from your family during Christmas holiday. Imagine a disease with no cure that paralyzes your limbs and killed hundreds if not thousand of children and adults well into the late 1950’s until a vaccine was finally perfected to stop it from spreading.
The disease is polio also labeled as poliomyelitis and infantile paralysis and it is a seriously highly contagious viral infection that can lead some to death, others to having problems breathing and winding up in a iron lung and paralysis. The author relates all of the false hopes that many had as different vaccines were created and failed and many methods of helping children and adults deal with the disease were tried, experimented and not until 1953 when Jonas Salk created and developed the first polio vaccine which finally led to the widespread prevention of poliomyelitis. Let’s take the journey back in time to understand the many different levels of treatment, the various attempts at perfecting many different vaccines and one woman who created her own miracle cure for children enabling them to walk again.
With his father in the army leaving his mother to face life with a son in braces and two other small children the sacrifices she made were more than commendable.
The research that the author relates about the numerous vaccines was quite revealing but nothing like the disputes between Jonas Salk and Sabin. The Salk vaccine came first and was delivered by injection whereas the Sabin vaccine was on a sugar cube. I researched the Salk vaccine and learned that it was given in two test groups one receiving the real vaccine and the other the placebo. At the end of the trial or experiment those receiving the real vaccine were inoculated against polio where those receiving the placebo had to be reinnoculated with the real vaccine. Polio mainly affects children under five years of age and there is no cure but can only be prevented. The author brings out that parents that do not vaccinate their children are leaving them wide open for possibly getting this illness whereas parents that do have their children vaccinated with the vaccine that is given multiple times can protect their children for life. This is important and vital.
As you learn more about his childhood you will also learn that much of what he experienced was funded by the National Foundation of Infantile Paralysis or NFIP who from 1938 through the approval of the Salk vaccine in 1955, the NFIP spent 233 million on polio patient care, providing significant foundation aid to more than 80 percent of America’s polio patients. That is amazing. The NFIP and Basil O’Connor ran into a problem once the Salk and Sabin vaccines were introduced. By 1958, the NFIP reached the point where their raison d’être was no longer valid and Basil O’Connor stated that the new mission of the Foundation was to prevent birth defects and in 1976 the NFIP became as we know it today the March of Dimes for Birth Defects. There are several chapters where the author allows us to hear his voice as child before and after each surgery and his fears about what will happen each time. Learning how to deal with a brace and after the fourth operation not needing one allow him to play Dodge ball and other fames but running fast was still not in the picture but first he had to deal with a huge cast on his leg and Dr. Lowman told his mother that the way he slept although odd was okay.
In conclusion this well researched and documented book would make a great documentary of his life and how this disease impacted his life and changed his childhood. But, the author is strong and he became quite successful in his own right. The battle lines between the two vaccines were drawn and the Salk was administered through injections and the Sabin on a sugar cube. The Salk was produced from a life from a attenuated virus and required booster shots. The Sabin single sugar cube of vaccine provided a life time of immunity therefore this vaccine was produced at a lower cost and the ease of administering it allowed it to become the vaccine of choice in the United States and other countries. More information about the controversies between the two vaccines are highlighted within chapter 17.
This vaccine is also used to eliminate cancerous tumors. He flashes to his family in Chapter 18 where the author explains that when writing this memoir he thought he knew what he was going to share but as you write you include more. Children develop their family expectations from he states their daily experiences through the “process of gradual or unconscious assimilations of ideas and knowledge, the same way a child learns the native language of his or her parents.” He gives examples of children learning from fathers that are drunk and mothers that are crazy but his life was not his own. He did not have a television set, computer or any of the modern things were have today. Dishes were washed and dried and families in the living room with listen to programs on the radio shows that many kids watched on television even today as reruns. He continues with why his parents get divorced and the story about his father’s socks that you will have to read in this chapter.
Finally in the epilogue we learn about his connection with the swim coach Mr. Pollack and how he aced algebra. His mother did not allow him to try out for basketball so he was smart and became the manager of the team. Believe it or not which is remarkable at 40 he played basketball on a team comprised up of phone company employees and quickly accept what he already knew that he was too short to get many rebounds but quicker than the taller guys. There is much more that he relates that you need to read for yourself to understand the courage, the persistence and the journey that he recaps in the epilogue as well as focusing in this section on the leading cancer researchers like Dr. Henry Friedman, reported that an injection of the polio virus directly into a brain tumor either shrunk or in a few cases completely eliminated the glioblastoma. Remarkable and astounding but the word cure was not used but it was a strong turning point to say the least. There is much more that he shares that the reader will learn when taking this journey, meeting his hospital friends, nurses and learning other polio survivors listed on page 244 and in conclusions about his wonderful life with his wife and family. This is a book that everyone needs to read because of the gravity of the subject and why parents need to be vigilant and make sure their children receive all of their immunizations.
Fran Lewis: Just reviews/MJ Magazine/MJ network

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About Just Reviews by:gabina49:

author educator book reviewer for authors reading and writing staff developer Book reviewer for manic readers, ijustfinished.com book pleasures and authors upon request blog tours on my blog and interviews with authors I am the author of five published books. I wrote three children's books in my Bertha Series and Two on Alzheimer's. Radio show talk host on Red River Radio/Blog Talk Radio Book Discussion with Fran Lewis the third Wed. of every month at one eastern. I interview 2 authors each month feature their latest releases. I review books for authors upon request and my latest book Sharp As A Tack or Scrambled Eggs Which Describes Your Brain? Is an E book, Kindle and on Xlibris.com Some of the proceeds from this last book will go to fund research in the area of Brain Traumatic Injury in memory of my sister Marcia who died in July.

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