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A Definite Resource

California cures :Don C. Reed

 

Miracles happen when you least expect it. Imagine a world where incurable diseases and difficult conditions no longer exist. What would happen is people who are deaf or hard of hearing could hear a voice of a parent or loved one for the first time? What about finding a cure for diabetes or blindness? Bob Klein, the father is a diabetic son, raised 34 million dollars for a citizens initiative, Proposition 71, to build a state stem cell program. Author Don C Reed worked with Klein first as a volunteer and later as Vice President for public policy for Americans for Cures Foundation.

The stem cell program has not one but 42 therapies, which have been tested, are being tested, or will be tested in human trials in six months.

Imagine two parents who never could hold their child in their arms and now can. Evangelina lived in a plastic bubble all day and all night. The issue addressed severe combined immune deficiency which translated means her immune system did not work. Imagine holding her wearing a nurses mask and living in a plastic room except to go to the hospital. What miracle happened? She was given a gift from the people of California. Proposition 71 has the goal to challenge chronic disease and disability with 3 billion dollars worth of stem cell research.

Within the pages of this book you will learn about the bubble baby cure. Diabetes: a stem cell credit card can be slipped under the skin where it will and provide the insulin a person requires. Paralysis: believe it or not an embryonic stem cell therapy has returned hand and arm function to six paralyzed patients. Blindness: people who were profoundly blind have restored a measure of vision.

Each story told is about a real life-changing incident that our author personally experienced, witnessed or researched or learned about. His story is titled to breathe or not to breathe will help readers understand how Dr. Brigitte Gompers lab made cells similar to the disease he had called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Pages 11 and 12 describe the process. Learn how he completed the process and understand the opposite if you don’t. The story titled when the dolphin broke my ear is truly remarkable. Ernestine is a 350 -pound dolphin that slammed into the author’s ear.

So how can there be a way to prevent a major cause of deafness? What if there was a replacement antibiotic that would not steal the patient’s hearing? Dr. Cheng and his colleagues may have developed a drug that to do just that. But, nothing worth happening or creating will happen without a struggle: Dr. Cheng and I quote states:
Regenerating hair cells in humans to restore hearing is going to be a long journey with numerous obstacles. But, with the support of the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, and the Stanford Initiative in Curing Hearing Loss…we are … positioned to overcome these challenges in years to come. Dr. Stephan Heller and Dr. Cheng are self-started. They have the funds, they will do the work and from what the author shares their lives are in the lab, working toward the day when the deaf can hear again. I truly hope so because my nephew was born profoundly deaf and he would love to hear his daughter’s voice. The Boy with the Butterfly Skin is dealing with what happens when your skin cannot heal. The title “Butterfly Skin” comes because the EB skin is so fragile as a butterfly’s wing.

What if you are born blind and can have some of your sight restored? These people live in darkness and would love to see the light. Dr. Humayun is fighting the most common cause of blindness among people over 60. Age-related Macular-Degeneration, a gradual irreversible loss of sight. Dr. Klassen is focusing and taking on Retinitis Pigmentosa, which steals vision from 3 million people worldwide. Humayun is employing embryonic stem cells, those blank check cells that can be turned into any kind of body cell required. Working at the University of Southern California his team is trying to restore the support cells at the back of the eye. These cells the author shares provide nutrition and protection to the light sensing cells of the retina. How they do this is described in detail on pages 35-37.

Don Reed has witnessed many of the stories told in person and the events that created the most important proposition: California’s Proposition 71 created in 2001. The process that followed and were implemented from this research into a new therapeutics based on stem cell biology and would you believe medical applications for regenerative medicine. Getting to know him in depth you will realize that he has worked as a patient advocate and with advocates, helped to get funding for research and development as a result of this Proposition. At this point it went to the voters who voted YES to a 3 billion stem cell research program that is an integral part of what is presented in this resource book. The program is called Californian Institute for Regenerative Medicine or CIRM. Obstacles are the norm and this state agency was blocked from beginning for three years by anti-science lawsuits and beat them all. Each story tells how many scientists were funded by CIRM and took on challenges to find cures for Alzheimer’s, blindness and disease and disability called chronic: incurable. Imagine being paralyzed and being able to use your hands or blind and being able to see your daughter for the first time. These stories are part of this book.

The most compelling story describes his son’s Roman football accident, his paralysis. Don had devoted his life and hope to helping Roman as a stem cell advocacy. Don work to pass legislation and pass the Roman Reed Spinal Cord Injury Research Act of 1999, which would raise millions for paralysis research. Bob Klein that I will elaborate more on at the close of this review worked with Reed to pass California’s Proposition 71 and established the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. Reed is VP of Americans for Cures Foundation. But, when he tells a story about his son and a trip that he was going to take and the fact that he can drive, move around and actually go from bed to chair by himself his heartwarming and enlightening. Dr. Roman Reed won’t ever give up and neither will his father until something is done to promote more stem cell research and funding to help fund cures for some many illnesses. These stories are motivating, helps readers to focus and understand the work of so many scientists and doctors that as you come to the end of each one you hope for a positive and happy ending. The frustrations were obvious and the struggles are many but the stories that are shared are hopeful. Cop at the Window is the story that features Roman and the result will surprise readers as he is stopped by a police officer while driving and recalls his football accident to a point and one doctor told him straight out that he’ in denial but he refuses to stand by his words and think he will always be paralyzed. Therefore, he has taken the challenge to find a cure for paralysis. Heart disease runs in his wife, Gloria’s family and this weighs on the author’s mind. How do they try and combat this is fantastic you need to learn what they do and try and follow it too: Exercise, not overeat and yet she had a problem. Funding is a serious issue and first any medication, which came form, a state-funded grant should be free for Californians.

Second: the cure itself was reward or is reward enough; let the market charge what it wants. Third: a compromise for low and middle-income folds, a discount. The rest read on your own. Will they share the knowledge developed so others can replicate their research findings? Second: If there is a bombshell breakthrough, a direct monetary payment must be given to the state stem cell research program: the amount varying on how much CIRM contributed. Third and foremost any marketable product developed with DIRM funding must have an accessibility program. There is much more that you can learn when you read: And How Will You is paying for that New Heart?

Reed is on many committees, attended more public Independent Oversight Committee Meetings and his insight and intelligence and his war to fight these diseases will be never ending until People WIN!

To summarize more the author concludes with how Bob Klein changed the world in three ways:

He managed to increase the availability or affordable housing for people in need. Contributing integrally to the raising of 1.5 billion dollars in diabetes research. Raising 3 billion fro stem cell research (and 3 billion in interest on the debt) by revolutionizing the funding mechanism of medical inquiry. He did so much more as he was President of Klein Financial Corporation. His belief in international research cooperation let to Partnership agreements with 14 foreign governments. His accomplishments far surpass so many. Awards, accolades and more and if Proposition 71 gets the funding for Part 2 the author knows that Bob will be the first one to help fight for it to be passed.

There are so many stories that I could go on forever in telling readers about cures for Cancer, Diabetes, heart disease, aging stem cells and even listing in chapter 59 the forty-two clinical trials happening now. Read this told from the heart and inspirational stories and keep this book as a resource for those that need assistance or information about so many illnesses. The Afterword has additional information and of course Don’s personal message. Imagine a world illness and disease free: Wouldn’t that be nice?

Fran Lewis: Just reviews/MJ magazine

 

About Just Reviews by:gabina49:

author educator book reviewer for authors reading and writing staff developer Book reviewer for manic readers, ijustfinished.com book pleasures and authors upon request blog tours on my blog and interviews with authors I am the author of five published books. I wrote three children's books in my Bertha Series and Two on Alzheimer's. Radio show talk host on Red River Radio/Blog Talk Radio Book Discussion with Fran Lewis the third Wed. of every month at one eastern. I interview 2 authors each month feature their latest releases. I review books for authors upon request and my latest book Sharp As A Tack or Scrambled Eggs Which Describes Your Brain? Is an E book, Kindle and on Xlibris.com Some of the proceeds from this last book will go to fund research in the area of Brain Traumatic Injury in memory of my sister Marcia who died in July.

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