//
you're reading...
Uncategorized

Joe Byrd: Tour May 3-28

Joe Byrd: Tour May 3-28

SYNOPSIS

At the end of WWI, Oscar, an American soldier in a French Army hospital, learned of his mother’s death while recovering from his war wounds. He remained in France to search for his father, an Impressionist painter, whose identity his mother never revealed. Through curious circumstances, he’s hired to be a gardener for Claude Monet.   Oscar jumped at the opportunity to further his landscaping career by working in Monet’s world-famous garden at Giverny. He hoped the most renowned Impressionist could help him find his father.​

Monet, tired and disheartened by his ailing health and deteriorating eyesight, took Oscar along on visits to his previous painting venues and allowed him to meet some of his art-world friends. These meetings provided insights into Monet’s life and art and clues to Oscar’s father’s identity.  ​

On a train returning from Paris to Giverny, Oscar met and fell in love with Isabelle, a beautiful young American artist, who introduced him to the emerging 1920’s fashions and mores. She is the daughter of one of Monet’s major American clients, which interests him. Over Monet’s daughters’ objections, Isabelle and Oscar become regular guests at family gatherings as their infatuation blossoms into a unique love affair. Oscar’s past, present, and future collide in a way that he could not have anticipated.

No violence and a little sex

Monet & Oscar: The Essence of Light: spotlight

The view inside the newly built studio was stunning. Two-story windows flooded the space with soft northern light. The size of the 6’ x 14’ canvases mounted on rollers before the artist dwarfed the 4’x3’ paintings Oscar had carted around all day. Being in the master’s presence was like reporting to the principal or his company’s commander.

“The paintings I did today were studies for these.” Monet stretched out his arms to encompass the most enormous paintings Oscar had ever seen. “Come sit on the couch, so I can get to know you.”

Monsieur Monet, who’d barely spoken a dozen words to him all day, now wanted to get to know him. He shook his head, hoping this wouldn’t become a habit—just another chapter in a strange, scary day. With luck, he might learn something about his employer. Perhaps his father was someone Monet knew.

“Tell me your full name and where you’re from,” Monet said as he handed Oscar what

he explained was a glass of Calvados, the local apple brandy.

Oscar, embarrassed, brushed the dirt from his hands on his pants, accepted the glass, and took a sip before answering. The color was deep amber, the taste a cross between rotten apples and kerosene. He could barely speak as the liquid fire burned a path down his throat. “My… my name is Oscar Bonhomme. I was born in Antibes and raised in California. My mother’s family is from Lyon.”

Monet paused, raised his eyelids, and then glanced at him sideways as he asked about his father.

“Not a part of my life. He left my mother before I was born,” was all Oscar could bring

himself to utter.

Monet lit a cigarette and watched the smoke curl up toward the disappearing ceiling before commenting. “Oscar is a good name. It’s my first name. I used it growing up before switching to my middle name, Claude when I began painting. Tell me about your life growing up in California.”

Oscar couldn’t believe that the most famous painter in the world, Monet, who hadn’t so much as acknowledged his existence all day, wanted to know about his life. The incredulity made him blink a few times.

“There’s not much to tell. My mother raised me on her own with help from her friends since we had no family around. She was a landscape designer and gardener for some mansions in and around San Francisco. I followed her into that field. We worked together with Japanese gardeners creating the Golden Gate Park. I learned more from them than from many of my college professors.”

“I don’t like Americans,” Monet responded dismissively.

Oscar smiled. “I can’t say I blame you, Monsieur. Americans can be pushy.” Monet

responded with another sideways glance and took a long sip of his Calvados.

The artist then launched into a brief history of his garden and lily pond, how he had bought the house in 1886 and added the land for the lily pond in 1890. He had designed the garden as his canvas featuring colors and designs that would blend well in his paintings. He selected colors to match his chosen palette and enjoyed mixing white flowers with the colored ones to achieve a shimmer in the scenes as he painted.

Monet & Oscar

SYNOPSIS

At the end of WWI, Oscar, an American soldier in a French Army hospital, learned of his mother’s death while recovering from his war wounds. He remained in France to search for his father, an Impressionist painter, whose identity his mother never revealed. Through curious circumstances, he’s hired to be a gardener for Claude Monet.   Oscar jumped at the opportunity to further his landscaping career by working in Monet’s world-famous garden at Giverny. He hoped the most renowned Impressionist could help him find his father.​

Monet, tired and disheartened by his ailing health and deteriorating eyesight, took Oscar along on visits to his previous painting venues and allowed him to meet some of his art-world friends. These meetings provided insights into Monet’s life and art and clues to Oscar’s father’s identity.  ​

On a train returning from Paris to Giverny, Oscar met and fell in love with Isabelle, a beautiful young American artist, who introduced him to the emerging 1920’s fashions and mores. She is the daughter of one of Monet’s major American clients, which interests him. Over Monet’s daughters’ objections, Isabelle and Oscar become regular guests at family gatherings as their infatuation blossoms into a unique love affair. Oscar’s past, present, and future collide in a way that he could not have anticipated.

No violence and a little sex

Monet & Oscar: The Essence of Light: spotlight

The view inside the newly built studio was stunning. Two-story windows flooded the space with soft northern light. The size of the 6’ x 14’ canvases mounted on rollers before the artist dwarfed the 4’x3’ paintings Oscar had carted around all day. Being in the master’s presence was like reporting to the principal or his company’s commander.

“The paintings I did today were studies for these.” Monet stretched out his arms to encompass the most enormous paintings Oscar had ever seen. “Come sit on the couch, so I can get to know you.”

Monsieur Monet, who’d barely spoken a dozen words to him all day, now wanted to get to know him. He shook his head, hoping this wouldn’t become a habit—just another chapter in a strange, scary day. With luck, he might learn something about his employer. Perhaps his father was someone Monet knew.

“Tell me your full name and where you’re from,” Monet said as he handed Oscar what

he explained was a glass of Calvados, the local apple brandy.

Oscar, embarrassed, brushed the dirt from his hands on his pants, accepted the glass, and took a sip before answering. The color was deep amber, the taste a cross between rotten apples and kerosene. He could barely speak as the liquid fire burned a path down his throat. “My… my name is Oscar Bonhomme. I was born in Antibes and raised in California. My mother’s family is from Lyon.”

Monet paused, raised his eyelids, and then glanced at him sideways as he asked about his father.

“Not a part of my life. He left my mother before I was born,” was all Oscar could bring

himself to utter.

Monet lit a cigarette and watched the smoke curl up toward the disappearing ceiling before commenting. “Oscar is a good name. It’s my first name. I used it growing up before switching to my middle name, Claude when I began painting. Tell me about your life growing up in California.”

Oscar couldn’t believe that the most famous painter in the world, Monet, who hadn’t so much as acknowledged his existence all day, wanted to know about his life. The incredulity made him blink a few times.

“There’s not much to tell. My mother raised me on her own with help from her friends since we had no family around. She was a landscape designer and gardener for some mansions in and around San Francisco. I followed her into that field. We worked together with Japanese gardeners creating the Golden Gate Park. I learned more from them than from many of my college professors.”

“I don’t like Americans,” Monet responded dismissively.

Oscar smiled. “I can’t say I blame you, Monsieur. Americans can be pushy.” Monet

responded with another sideways glance and took a long sip of his Calvados.

The artist then launched into a brief history of his garden and lily pond, how he had bought the house in 1886 and added the land for the lily pond in 1890. He had designed the garden as his canvas featuring colors and designs that would blend well in his paintings. He selected colors to match his chosen palette and enjoyed mixing white flowers with the colored ones to achieve a shimmer in the scenes as he painted.

About Just Reviews by:gabina49:

author educator book reviewer for authors reading and writing staff developer Book reviewer for manic readers, ijustfinished.com book pleasures and authors upon request blog tours on my blog and interviews with authors I am the author of five published books. I wrote three children's books in my Bertha Series and Two on Alzheimer's. Radio show talk host on Red River Radio/Blog Talk Radio Book Discussion with Fran Lewis the third Wed. of every month at one eastern. I interview 2 authors each month feature their latest releases. I review books for authors upon request and my latest book Sharp As A Tack or Scrambled Eggs Which Describes Your Brain? Is an E book, Kindle and on Xlibris.com Some of the proceeds from this last book will go to fund research in the area of Brain Traumatic Injury in memory of my sister Marcia who died in July.

Discussion

2 thoughts on “Joe Byrd: Tour May 3-28

  1. Thanks for posting! The presentation is hard to read though. If your readers want a better view, and enter the giveaway, they can come this way: https://francebooktours.com/2021/03/15/joe-byrd-on-tour-monet-and-oscar/

    Posted by WordsAndPeace | May 28, 2021, 8:44 pm
  2. Not sure why it’s hard to read. It’s clear on the site where it’s posted

    Posted by Just Reviews by:gabina49: | May 28, 2021, 8:52 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Archives

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,489 other followers

Categories

my eventd

May 2021
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

fran

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2,489 other followers

MY EVENTS AND GREAT BOOKS

May 2021
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

archives

Blog Stats

  • 91,434 hits
May 2021
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

just reviews

request a review or an interview on my radio show

recenet great books

great books to read

Twitter Updates

Error: Please make sure the Twitter account is public.

Radio show dates

May 2021
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31  

Upcoming Events

No upcoming events

%d bloggers like this: